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Author Topic: Aaron Fike & heroin  (Read 1247 times)
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Vivian
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« on: April 10, 2008, 09:17:24 PM »

Aaron Fike finally admitted he was on heroin in some of the truck races when he was driving.  Saw this on Nascar Now and read it on Jayski.

Why do these kids give up so much opportunity to drugs?
« Last Edit: April 11, 2008, 08:39:04 PM by Vivian » Logged
Cheryl
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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2008, 12:56:03 PM »

I read this story the other day and was aghast that someone would get into a race car after shooting up on heroin.  To me, it's a function of rich kids with too much money and no respect for anyone else.  Here's the comments from Jayski today.  I just missed Harvick's comments on XM last night.

"Drivers upset over lack of drug testing: Sprint Cup drivers Kevin Harvick, Tony Stewart, Jimmie Johnson and Kasey Kahne say they never have undergone a drug test as NASCAR competitors. "In the 10 years that I've raced, I've never been drug-tested," Harvick said. "To me, that's not a proper drug policy for a professional sport. We haven't made any headway whatsoever on the drug-testing policy." Harvick and Stewart were reacting to an ESPN The Magazine story this week in which former driver Aaron Fike said he competed in Craftsman Truck Series races while he was on heroin. "I have been in a race with him and I know for a fact that he's not the only one," Harvick said. "There's another driver that was suspended that I can almost guarantee you was in the race car while he was under the influence, and that pisses me off. I'm sure I'll be blasted for saying what I feel, but I don't want to be on a race track with people like that. It's irresponsible more than anything." All four Cup drivers said they are in favor of regular testing.
"I would love it,'' Stewart said. "I've never been asked to take one yet. I think it should be mandatory to have random drug testing. I think it's a great idea. The Fike situation shows that as an organization, we're not doing a good job of seeing this before it happens." NASCAR's substance-abuse policy includes the right to test any driver at any time, but officials only do so if they believe a competitor might have a problem. "The responsibility here rests across the board -- with the drivers and competitors, owners, teams and NASCAR," said Kerry Tharp, NASCAR's director of communication. "We test an individual when we have reasonable suspicion. A positive test results in severe consequences and is a career-changing moment for that person. NASCAR's policy is also supported by the various policies that the teams have in place that are required under the driver/owner agreements. No system is flawless, but we believe our zero tolerant policy that is in place has served the sport well."
Fike was arrested last year in Ohio for possession of heroin.
"I had a long talk with NASCAR about this last year," Harvick said. "It almost seems like it fell on deaf ears. They were more mad that I had a reaction to the situation than they were about trying to move forward. They heard what I said, but my name's not Jeff Gordon. I'm disappointed that we have to react and answer all these questions again."
Tharp said NASCAR officials always take it seriously when drivers come to them with questions or complaints. "Let me assure you that no issue or conversation that we have with a driver, owner or team member ever falls on deaf ears," Tharp said. "Now, they might not always come out of the meeting with the answer they're looking for, but we listen." Harvick wants to see NASCAR test drivers and crew members several times a year. "I'm sure I'll have to do it for speaking my mind," Harvick said. "But if I have to pee in a cup 15 times a year, I'm happy to do it. The bad part is it isn't fair to the 95 percent of his garage that is clean. But I want everybody in the world to know our sport is clean. I want fans and sponsors to know this garage is clean." Harvick and his wife, DeLana, own truck series and Nationwide Series teams at Kevin Harvick Inc. Harvick does not conduct drug tests for his employees. "I don't right now and maybe we need to change the way we look at it, too," he said. "But in the end, it's the responsibility of [NASCAR] to make sure all the drivers are clean." Harvick said Fike drove a couple of races for KHI several years ago. "There was no reason to think something was wrong," Harvick said. "I don't know about drugs, to tell you the truth. But I want to know about the guy racing next to me and not have to wonder if he was out the night before and isn't clean."
Kahne said he had suspicions about Fike. "I definitely wondered about Aaron, so I'm sure others did," Kahne said. "When he said he did heroin before a race, that's incredible that no one knew. As much money as there is in this sport, I think we should take a little more effort to make sure every driver is clean." Harvick believes NASCAR should have changed its substance-abuse policy long ago. "You can tell I'm a little bit frustrated about the situation," he said. "As someone who respects the sport and respects my sponsors, I'm upset that I have to answer questions about Aaron Fike. It really ticks me off, because every driver in this garage should be taking random drug tests." Harvick believes NASCAR needs to do a better job of staying ahead of the curve. "It's just like the safety thing back in 2001," he said. "We didn't react until that situation happened [with Dale Earnhardt's death]. With drug-testing, there's no reason in the world today not to be proactive. "This is about forward thinking about how the drivers are perceived from a public standpoint. If I'm a fan, I don't want to think, 'Are they really clean?' This always has been perceived as a clean sport. Let's not let that change now, because it is. But let's prove it."(ESPN.com)"

Cheryl
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Desmond
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« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2008, 04:49:59 PM »

I completely agree with Kevin.  This is clearly a wake-up call to NASCAR. 

But then again, I'm afraid that they are waiting for someone to be seriously hurt - or even die - in a collision with a driver under the influence.  That's a scenario that happens a lot on the roads, and can certainly happen at the very high speeds of the NASCAR vehicles.
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« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2008, 07:47:27 PM »

There's no reason why NASCAR should be testing all drivers on a random basis.  This sport is dangerous enough as it is, and it doesn't need a driver that is high out on the track.
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Vivian
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2008, 08:42:41 PM »

Something to ponder:

So they test before a race and it comes out clean.  Since there is lots of time in between getting into the car, who is to say that a person could not just inject, inhale, take or whatever they do after the test, but still before he gets into the car?  Viola, they still haven't caught him or stopped him and the real danger is still there.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2008, 08:45:04 PM by Vivian » Logged
sally
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« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2008, 12:38:14 AM »

I don't think it's any accident that the drug suspensions have happened since the average age of drivers has gone down and salaries have gone up.  We;ve seen it happen in other sports, and drivers are, after all, human.

Sally
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super61
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« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2008, 01:47:54 AM »

but this again goes back to the team owners, remember, they work for indpendent owners, not nascar. if nascar choses to test, it will be a public affair. a car owner does not want to know that his star driver or up and comer has a drug problem. it should fall on the team owners as a business to test all employees

ken
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« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2008, 02:54:25 AM »

I just wanted to throw out a couple comments regarding the drug issue.  A driver racing on any hallucinogenic drug is one heckuva scary thought.  I'm not sure of the current NASCAR testing protocol, but it just doesn't seem to be working effectively.  Yes, drivers have been caught through their program, but I just have the sick feeling there are others slipping through.  Drug testing has probably been advanced due to technology, but it's still a timely process; in other words, not going to happen in a day.  Maybe NASCAR could take a hint from the DOT and test any and all drivers involved in an accident as well as a random sampling of drivers in each race.  I personally don't have a problem with drug testing as a violation of my individual rights.  I spent most of military career showing up for work and told to report to the medical center to pee in a bottle.  The same held true as a CDL driver...every weigh station was a question.  In other words, it didn't bother me a bit.  My military career was in electronics and you didn't want anyone strung out on drugs working with you around electronics.  I pretty much feel the same way pulling 80 tons of junk alongside someone strung out.

NASCAR really needs to step up to the plate and implement a viable drug testing program.

James
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« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2008, 03:42:38 PM »

You folks are making good points. There really is no reason that individual teams do not test for drugs, routinely and randomly. Implementing a drug policy is not that difficult, and I am suprised that, at least as far as I know, no team owner, or sponsor for that matter, has not insisted on it.
  That said, Nascar is playing with fire by NOT testing.
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« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2008, 12:07:28 AM »

something else that made me really wonder about this topic.. kh said he has never been tested by nascar, nor did he allude to ever being tested as an employee of rcr. then stated he does not test his employees. so for all that nascar says they have a program in place is all hogwash, if you are not suspected of doing drugs you will never be tested for them by nascar is pretty much the way i read it. i can guarantee that every employee on payroll at ThorSport is tested prior to employment. any sign of any drug and you are not working there, plain and simple. so there are some owners who understand the risk of the team and the safety of others involved and i think nascar needs to mandate to team owners some type of testing from the floor sweeper to the star driver. this will be interesting to see how this gets handled.

ken
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Vivian
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« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2008, 08:19:07 PM »

I agree that the owners should have something in place and then Nascar should have random.  Sadly though, I don't see them doing this
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