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Author Topic: NYC track  (Read 1625 times)
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sally
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« on: July 27, 2004, 09:18:28 PM »

Did anyone else watch Wind Tunnel last night?  When Despain announced that ISC bought the 600 acres on Staten Island, he said there was also some talk about how to eliminate some of the traffic problems...like no camping or infield RV's?  Maybe they will give you a subway token along with your ticket?  And Nascar has ALREADY announced there will be 2 Cup races there a year.......and an Indy car race!   Hmmm.  That tells me that they can't be thinking of building anything too short with lots of banking.

What does our NY contingent think about this?
Sally
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Cheryl
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2004, 12:37:14 PM »

Quote from: "sally"
Did anyone else watch Wind Tunnel last night?  When Despain announced that ISC bought the 600 acres on Staten Island, he said there was also some talk about how to eliminate some of the traffic problems...like no camping or infield RV's?  Maybe they will give you a subway token along with your ticket?  And Nascar has ALREADY announced there will be 2 Cup races there a year.......and an Indy car race!   Hmmm.  That tells me that they can't be thinking of building anything too short with lots of banking.


Lou heard about this in the Scene Daily Newsletter the other day and was reading to me.  When he started out with something like "ISC buys Staten Island..."  I immediately thought about the settlers buying Staten Island from the indians for $24.   :lol:   It just struck as funny.  Can't help it.

But seriously, yesterday on Jayski and on thatsracin, I believe, they said ISC plans to build a 3/4 mile track there.  I'm assuming this will be the first clone of Richmond.  That is the track all the drivers say they'd like to see replicated.  If they are actually building a short track, I'd be interested in seeing it on TV.  We'd certainly NEVER go there even though it is probably closer than Martinsville because of all the traffic hassles involved around NYC.  What worries me about this though - does it mean Darlington will lose it's final date in a couple years or the bastards will start raiding the dates from Martinsville now that they own it?  I'd have no problem with a short track whereever they build it as long as it doesn't mean sacrificing a track that has good racing already all for "TV ratings."

As to Sally's question about RV parking, I'm sure ISC would prefer not to have all those "rowdy" campers there anyway.  Or if they have any parking, it will be the elite $1500 camping like they are adding to the infield at Daytona now.  That way, they can ensure only the "right" kind of folks camp at their new track.  

I was getting pretty tired of how Allen Bestwick kept telling us in amazement all weekend how the campers had been at NH "all week" before the race.  He really needs to get out more because that happens at every track I've ever been to.  For some reason, TV and the drivers always feel they must build up how wonderful the NH track is and how much the folks up in the north love it.  Like it's their job to do PR for it because everyone watching on TV thinks it's one of the worst tracks on the circuit.

Cheryl
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John
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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2004, 01:06:33 PM »

Quote from: "Cheryl"
For some reason, TV and the drivers always feel they must build up how wonderful the NH track is and how much the folks up in the north love it.  Like it's their job to do PR for it because everyone watching on TV thinks it's one of the worst tracks on the circuit.

Cheryl


I know this is thread on the NYC track, but this needed a reply.

If the folks up in the north didn't love it, they would not sell out over 100,000 seats for 2 races a season.  Yes, a flat track may not be as exciting as some of the banked tracks, but the people at NH have put a lot of work into the track and it is finally showing.  

If we are talking competition, 30 cars finished on the lead lap compared to the 8 or 9 at Rockingham.

The first time I went there, I said that TV does not do this place justice.  I could not believe how fast these guys were driving into the corners thanks to the "asphalt from India".  The surrounding areas on the track property are great for people to walk and see things and the fans are great.  I can see what they are saying about why it is great.  Come on up and freeze your pumpkin off with the rest of us! Cheesy
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Cheryl
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« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2004, 01:21:58 PM »

Quote from: "John"

I know this is thread on the NYC track, but this needed a reply.

If the folks up in the north didn't love it, they would not sell out over 100,000 seats for 2 races a season.  Yes, a flat track may not be as exciting as some of the banked tracks, but the people at NH have put a lot of work into the track and it is finally showing.  

If we are talking competition, 30 cars finished on the lead lap compared to the 8 or 9 at Rockingham.

The first time I went there, I said that TV does not do this place justice.  I could not believe how fast these guys were driving into the corners thanks to the "asphalt from India".  The surrounding areas on the track property are great for people to walk and see things and the fans are great.  I can see what they are saying about why it is great.  Come on up and freeze your pumpkin off with the rest of us! Cheesy


Well, I was actually talking about the people who come to camp so far in advance.  That happens at any track on the circuit.

We all know that people in certain areas of the country are starved for NASCAR so will go to ANY track to see it, regardless of whether the race is exciting or not.  I know a lot of folks who hold tickets to NH and they readily admit they just go because it is there and to socialize with their friends.  More power to them if they want to drop $100 on something like that, but the rest of us sitting at home want to see side-by-side racing, not a parade and wreckfest like we saw on Sunday.  How many lead changes did we have?  3-4 and one was Spencer staying out under caution.  How many lead changes did we have at every race at Rockingham (or North Wilkesboro for that matter)?

I consider "competition" more than just going fast.  To me, it's when there are clearly two (or more) grooves where you can race side by side lap after lap and actually pass without someone going into the wall.  We had that at Rockingham.  We still don't have that at NH after how many years?

I wouldn't drive across the street to a track without two grooves because that's not my definition of "racing."  

Cheryl
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John
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« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2004, 02:38:58 PM »

Quote from: "Cheryl"
How many lead changes did we have?  3-4 and one was Spencer staying out under caution.  How many lead changes did we have at every race at Rockingham (or North Wilkesboro for that matter)?

I consider "competition" more than just going fast.  To me, it's when there are clearly two (or more) grooves where you can race side by side lap after lap and actually pass without someone going into the wall.  We had that at Rockingham.  We still don't have that at NH after how many years?

I wouldn't drive across the street to a track without two grooves because that's not my definition of "racing."  

Cheryl


The grooves at Rockingham were 2 or 3 wide in the corners with the slow cars trying to stay out of the way of the faster drivers while they put the field down many laps. Then one lane on the back stretch and 2 going into turn one with one driver hoping to push the other driver up the track to make the pass.  Then 1/3 of the way into the race half of the field is in the way of the leaders because they are getting put down more laps.  Yeah, that's good competition I guess.

The only reason I replied to your comment is that I have things I like about NH despite the fact you don't like it at all.  Your definition of racing and mine may not be the same (or it could even be closer than we think because this is only a short conversation) and everyone's opinions are different, but if you are willing to criticize a track that I like, I have a right to defend it or at least say why I like it.  You would do the same thing, wouldn't you?
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Cheryl
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« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2004, 03:07:27 PM »

Quote from: "John"
The only reason I replied to your comment is that I have things I like about NH despite the fact you don't like it at all.  Your definition of racing and mine may not be the same (or it could even be closer than we think because this is only a short conversation) and everyone's opinions are different, but if you are willing to criticize a track that I like, I have a right to defend it or at least say why I like it.  You would do the same thing, wouldn't you?


Yes, of course.  I just think your assessment of the multiple grooves at Rockingham is a bit off.  Yes, a lot of cars get lapped there because they don't have the proper set-up, but I've seen side-by-side racing among lead lap cars all the way around the track all race long.  Set-ups and adjusting to a challenging surface is one of the things I enjoy about racing in addition to the ability to race side by side.

If NASCAR didn't have the silly free pass back to the lead lap, we would have certainly had about 12 less cars on the lead lap at Louden as well, wouldn't we?  So I just think talking about how many cars get lapped anywhere is not an appropriate comparison.  That happens at almost every track if there aren't 12 cautions (except those 2.5 miles or more in length).

Cheryl
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ronbarnes77
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« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2004, 03:26:42 PM »

the nyc track first of all may never get built.2. if it does it will be the most expensive ever built and the fans will pay for it.3. parking will be extremely limited and don't listen to nascar about public transport because there is none no subways and no buses.4.enviromental concerns are going to be no easy hurdle for isc to get around and the politicians on the island don't support the project.
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sally
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« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2004, 04:52:25 PM »

I agree with Cheryol about Rockingham.  I remember in 2000 when BLab and Dale Sr. ran side-by=side there for about 15 laps for the lead.  Bobby won, and when they asked him about the racing with Big E, he said he glanced over at him after about 8 laps side by side, and all he saw was the big grin on Earnhardt's face.  (Due to the open face helmet, no doubt.)  Aside from that, the challenges at Rockingham were so great...tire wear...and it took a very skilled driver to earn a win there...not just someone with superior aerodynamics.  Maybe that's what we miss...the tracks that test a drivers true skill, rather than how much moeny they can spend?  Ya think?
Sally :?
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Vivian
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« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2004, 05:55:52 PM »

The prediction that the track may not come into being until 2009 may have a larger effect than we think.  What will be the state of Nascar then and what will the fan base consist of?  Not as many true fans as it now has for sure.  I think the trendy fans that Staci mentioned before will be the larger portion at that time.  Makes me laugh because I can just see Cup racing being watched by the type of people who where shown watching the Ascot horse race in My Fair Lady.  Just imagine that scene if you can.   :lol:  

Okay, on to serious stuff, by then will we even care?  And who knows what the cars will look like then?  They seem to change a lot in 5 or 6 years and who knows, we may even have boxed templets and engines and just a cute parade of colors.  Uh oh, I was supposed to be serious now.  Ummm, I am I think........ :wink:
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ronbarnes77
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« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2004, 07:41:25 PM »

something else to ponder vivan is that nyc area  is planning at least 6 different sports arenas in the next 7 yrs and the 2012 olmypics.that is a LOT of taypayers money.
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John
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« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2004, 09:15:02 PM »

Quote from: "Cheryl"

I just think your assessment of the multiple grooves at Rockingham is a bit off. Cheryl


I'm a bit off with the way I see things again, but that's nothing new.  I'll agree to disagree and move on because we can go on and on about this and the out come will still be the same.  You know what you like and I know what I like.

I will agree with Ron about NYC.  It won't happen.  Regis Philbin wouldn't know what NASCAR was if Jeff Gordon didn't co-host once in a while.  But wait, he co-hosts with Kelly Ripa, so that means Regis wouldn't know what NASCAR is.  Maybe if they had champane tents instead of beer tents, if they had room.  It doesn't make sense to me.
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