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Author Topic: No NASCAR "side-by-side"  (Read 2815 times)
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sally
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« Reply #15 on: July 22, 2006, 11:34:25 PM »

How about taking that 45 minutes of 'pre race coverage' and front loading it with commercials?  I'd watch just as many of them as I do now, and they could reach their 'commercial quota' without taking away from track time.  I would be a lot more inclined to use the product of a company that showed that much consideration of racing and it's fans.

Sally
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Benson23Fan
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« Reply #16 on: July 23, 2006, 01:44:26 AM »

The reason they do pre race shows is actually to help spread the commercial count out more. However most of the advertisers demand a certain amount of time during the race as well.
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Cheryl
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« Reply #17 on: July 24, 2006, 01:28:32 PM »

I cut and pasted this article by David Poole from the Charlotte Observer because I think you have to be registered on their site to read it.  He has some interesting observations and tried to get some clarification from the NA$CAR talking head on his side-by-side comments.   I'm not saying I agree with all of this, but Poole makes some interesting points.  I especially agree with his comments about how fans can never get enough of their favorite drivers and conversely think all other drivers are covered too much.   Smiley

Cheryl

"Life in the Turn Lane
Some thoughts and observations as the cars whiz by
Friday, July 21, 2006, David Poole
Viewers have every right to demand more, but only so much is going to happen
I found myself listening to the guys on XM Radio's NASCAR channel Thursday night when they were talking about the "side by side" deal ESPN and ABC use on their IndyCar Series telecasts.
Specifically, they were addressing a story in the Long Island (N.Y.) Press about whether the format, in which commercials share the screen with a video image of what's happening on the track, might ever be used in NASCAR telecasts when ABC/ESPN resumes broadcasting stock-car events next year.
The specific sticking point was a quote from NASCAR managing director of corporate communications Ramsey Poston.
"We've looked at a lot of options to enhance the fan/viewer experience but feel that a split-screen presentation of ads and racing serves neither the fan nor advertiser," Poston said.
This comment, of course, was drawing hoots from fans and the hosts of the show alike. Fans' interests would certainly served by splitting the screen, as they would if race telecasts had no commercials at all.
Normally, it wouldn't bother me a bit to let Poston twist in the wind a little on this one. It's not that I don't like him, but he and I sometimes find ourselves with competing interests as he and I both try to do our jobs.
But I can't do it in this case. Poston didn't choose his words well. When I talked to him on the phone on Friday he said he realized after reading his comments he came off sounding like he was trying to speak for the fans more than he'd intended to do.
In clarifying his position, Poston said that NASCAR has looked at what ABC/ESPN does with the split screen and doesn't think that it does justice either to the race coverage or to advertisers.
And he's right.
You're hearing the commercial sound, and the only thing that can be said for the small view of the race is that it's better than nothing. But only barely.
Advertisers, meanwhile, are paying far more for commercial time on NASCAR races than they are on IRL broadcasts. NASCAR has a big-time TV deal, while the IRL basically sells the Indianapolis 500 to ABC and throws the rest of its series in with the deal.
It also should be pointed out that "side-by-side" certainly hasn't been a television ratings bonanza for the IRL, either. If an advertiser buys a full-page ad in The Charlotte Observer, he gets a full page. If an advertiser pays the going rate for a spot on a NASCAR telecast, that company ought to get what it's paying for as well.
It might be a more popular view to say otherwise, but it'd be hypocritical. I don't blame NASCAR fans for wanting to see races without commercials. I don't blame fans for complaining when restarts are missed or commercials get backed up and the coverage of races gets choppy.
I frequently get e-mails from fans who've timed commercials or written down how many laps of racing they see in a certain period of a telecast. I tell them time and time again that the commercial load in a NASCAR telecast isn't significantly larger than what you see in a night of prime-time shows.
Those shows have natural breaks, but NASCAR races do not. Commercials just seem more intrusive in the race broadcasts.
I heard Ken Schanzer of NBC Sports say once that NASCAR is the "best covered" sport on television because of all the places the networks can take cameras. I think he's absolutely right.
If something happens on a commercial, it's quickly replayed from 12 different angles. Fans don't miss much, if anything.
Fans want more than they'll ever get because that's natural. They never want to miss a pass or a pit stop or a restart. They always want to see 15 or 20 drivers interviewed in the postrace, and sometimes time simply doesn't allow that.
A fan's favorite driver can never be shown enough and the driver he hates most is always going to be shown too much.
That's how fans are. There are some fans out there who would be willing to pay to watch races commercial free, but not enough of them to make that a viable commercial entity.
So as long as advertisers are paying the bills - and they're very, very big bills - commercials are going to be part of NASCAR telecasts."
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Desmond
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« Reply #18 on: July 24, 2006, 05:05:07 PM »

Quote from: "Cheryl"
So I guess I'll be listening to the restarts on MRN/PRN as I am today during this sorry excuse for coverage of the Busch race!  It's just a crime to even claim they're covering this race.  I lost count of the missed restarts after about 4.


I noticed all those missed restarts, too.  In fact, after each commercial break, I expected Bozo the Clown to come back and say, "Hey kiddies, guess what?  The caution flag has waved again!  Here's what happened..."  or, alternately, "Hey, folks, the race has started again!  It should be fun!" :lol:

The TV presentation was as boring as I have ever seen it. :x
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Buddy Wayne Barefoot, unhappy with Baby Brian's handiwork, finds his true passion.Smiley
Vivian
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« Reply #19 on: July 24, 2006, 08:33:15 PM »

Being objective is something I take pride in.  Whether it is about my favorite driver, football team, commercials or anything else.

About the commercial breaks, I don't like them but I know they are a necessary evil.  I do think that maybe NBC/TNT  has better placement of commercials and to me most of them are less offensive than the ones on Fox.  I know the announcers do all they can and I have liked the fact that there are not as many as in car shots this half of the season so far.

It all boils down to the fact that that we are just mere fans and not of the corporate world trying to satisfy shareholders or fill our pockets with profit.  In other words, we are small and make not even a pimple on a frog's #*&%**.  So our feelings don't count and we will have to live with what they choose to show us on tv if we want to continue watching.  

JMO
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Cheryl
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« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2006, 05:49:42 PM »

From Jayski yesterday.  Guess the "mouthpiece" decided to backpedal a bit after realizing how condescending he sounded:

"More on the Split Screen for TV: Ramsey Poston, NASCAR's managing director for corporate communications, touched off strong reaction on internet message board with a quote in the Long Island (N.Y.) Press about NASCAR’s opinion of the "side by side" approach ABC/ESPN uses with commercials on Indy Racing League races. "We've looked at a lot of options to enhance the fan/viewer experience but feel that a split-screen presentation of ads and racing serves neither the fan nor advertiser," Poston told the newspaper. On Friday [July 21st], Poston said he didn't mean for his comment to come off as though he was speaking for the fans. "We are open to it, if there is a better way of presenting it," he said. “But we haven't seen an idea that we think would work both the advertisers and fans." On its IRL broadcasts, ABC/ESPN present commercials with audio on part of the screen while showing an image from the track, with no sound, on another part. The method has produced no appreciable gain in IRL ratings for ABC/ESPN, however. Advertisers pay considerably higher rates for ads on NASCAR telecasts.(Thatsracin)(7-28-2006)"

It's still all about the sponsors, of course, and the hell with the fans... :evil:

Cheryl
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sally
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« Reply #21 on: July 29, 2006, 06:03:58 PM »

Of course, if it doesn't snag NEW fans, it isn't worth it.  Why should they worry about keeping the EXISTING fans happy?

It's also obvious that this guy has never had to sit through an entire race, trying to make sense of what's happening by watching the 'excellent' broadcast.

Sally
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Cheryl
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« Reply #22 on: July 29, 2006, 06:10:55 PM »

Quote from: "sally"
Of course, if it doesn't snag NEW fans, it isn't worth it.  Why should they worry about keeping the EXISTING fans happy?


Exactly!  I am listening to the repeat of the evening talk show on XM and the host (Joe Costello) just said the same thing.  He said "they don't care about the viewers they already have; they want something to draw new viewers."  He pointed out that having "side by side" isn't going to draw a new viewer to NASCAR.  So that about sums it up.  As usual, the networks and NA$CAR don't care about the viewers they already have.

Cheryl
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sally
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« Reply #23 on: July 29, 2006, 09:52:36 PM »

Now, give ESPN credit for being willing to consider the side by side.  It's Nascar that won't allow it!

sally
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