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Author Topic: 48 & 5 after race inspection  (Read 1656 times)
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Vivian
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« on: September 28, 2005, 01:38:48 AM »

Very interesting article here.

http://www.thatsracin.com/mld/thatsracin/12748827.htm

Well, what do you members think of this?

I would say something is very suspicious in Nascar... :smt018
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derbyit857
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« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2005, 07:43:52 PM »

Hmm..

Almost sounds like for sure something was different with the shocks on the two Hendrick cars!  I dunno about anyone else but I have never seen a car's shocks "settle".  The ride hide is what it is and as a normal street car gets older, the shocks get weaker and are lower.  Unless NASCAR shocks are different in design than stock ones.  Also I guess we aren't taking corners at the same speed they are so maybe I am wrong, but it doesn't seem right to me!
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Vivian
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« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2005, 09:24:07 PM »

You know, I asked Don about that, too.  He has been a mechanic for many years.  He said, 'No way'.  So what is the deal here?  Maybe they do use different kinds?  He did mention something (I will ask him again later) something you can do to for height and then can chuck it out later in order not to get caught.  I will have to find out so I don't misquote the word (s) he used.  He also mentioned the fact that Biffle mentioned the height of JJ's right rear last year and shortly after that was when JJ started to slow down some and nothing else was ever said about it until this year again.  I am confused...
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sally
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« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2005, 11:50:27 PM »

I read that Jr. also made some comment during the race about the height of the rear bumper on the #5 car.  This isn't the first time the 48 and 5 have 'failed' post race inspection.  Last time they were fined, appealed, and, miracle of miracles, had the fines lifted!  If you keep getting caught for the same sort of thing, I have to believe there ust be something there.  If Nascar chooses to ignore it, well....
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TexasDeb
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« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2005, 01:23:41 AM »

I was following the race post on Mark Martin's forum, and several people mentioned his comments over the radio about the rear height on the 48.  I haven't seen that in the press anywhere even though Martin was running close to Johnson for much of the race.  Just how visibly different was that car?  The penalties earlier in the year, the confiscated 25, and now the comments this week do make me wonder.

Deb
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Cheryl
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« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2005, 01:29:43 PM »

IF this is true, it just makes me question NASCAR's credibility even more than I already did.  It's bad enough to not take the win away from cars who have something questionable in post-race inspection during ANY race.  But to have something questionable on a car that stands to win the championship bothers me even more.  Not that I don't already think everything with the Chase, the free pass, and all is bogus to begin with.  

There's not a whole lot about it on the internet, so it seems like NASCAR is making everyone play it down.  I'm just curious if NBC will address this issue in their pre-race show.  

Cheryl
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old hot rodder
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« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2005, 05:35:56 PM »

Nascar's credibility-----now that is an oxymoron if I ever heard one! :-D





 92 more to go! Love little blue helmets. Cheesy
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William James
sally
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« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2005, 11:41:43 AM »

Just read on Jayski about the #5 and 48 shocks, Vivian.  Seems they were designed to raise the spoiler UP when the car goes over bumps, thus keeping the spoiler up for downforce.  Then they would 'settle' after about 15 seconds.  Nascar speculated that the #5 had been testing the shocks for quite a while before they tried them on the #48.  It is expected that Nascar will eliminate this grey area, perhaps by this Friday.

Sal
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Cheryl
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« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2005, 05:43:01 PM »

I saw the article on Jayski and then heard some stuff on XM today at lunch.  Apparently, Geoff Smith from Roush said it wasn't technically cheating, just "creative engineering" or something like that.  On XM, they had a press conference with Ryan Newman today and the reporters got on this subject.  Though not happy that the teams didn't get penalized, he made some good points that it is similar to jacking a bunch of rounds of wedge into/out of the car in the middle of the race.  He explained this could raise the rear of the car during the race and if they took the wedge back out before the end, the result would be the same.  This kind of explains the grey area in the rule book that needs to be addressed.  Newman said the cars only have to meet the height requirements before and after the race; that no one's going out there and checking them in the middle of the race.  Interesting analogy and probably explains NASCAR's decision not to penalize the teams, but to make an amendment to the rule book to cover this.  

Glad I got to hear a driver explain exactly what happened.  

Cheryl
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sally
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« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2005, 12:13:26 PM »

I've read several interviews with many drivers about the shocks, and most of them were not happy.  Newman was wondering how many chances you get to pass post race inspection, and DJ was livid.  Many drivers cited the fact that this wasn't the first time Hendrick cars have been 'iffy' in post race inspection.  I recall that the #49 car was penalized for not meeting height requirements this year, and their appeal (a parts failure, similar to the claim that got Chad Knaus off probation) was not allowed.  even the drivers seem to feel that 'rules' are selectively applied to certain drivers...Mark Martin was particularly unhappy.
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old hot rodder
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« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2005, 03:51:10 PM »

Cheryl, one of the reasons I like Newman is his ability to explain some of these things, but this deal still begs the question, does Nascar REALLY need to micro manage these things so closely? It just seems to me that the more closely Nascar manages the cars and restricts the ability of the teams to "improvise", the worse the actual racing becomes.
 Once the other teams figured out the tricks which the 48 and 5 were doing, they would all do it and the field would level out again.
 Let 'em race. Cheesy
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William James
sally
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« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2005, 02:51:27 AM »

I thought Greg Biffle had the most interesting take on the shock issue.  He said that, according to the 'rule book', anything that alters the hight of the car, other than the jack bolts, is illegal.  Is a shock a jack bolt?
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Cheryl
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« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2005, 01:11:16 PM »

Apparently, Kevin Harvick's crew chief was "ejected" and their qualifying speed disallowed after a fuel filler incident on Friday.  Now I can see where some folks might think this is inconsistent with what happened at with the 48 and 6 at Dover, but fuel, tires, and engines have always been the three big no-no items for NASCAR. This is also the second time Harvick's team has had an issue with their fuel filler system this season.  Berrier was suspended for 4 races earlier this season for something similar.

It's also pretty easy for NASCAR to make this kind of call with a non-Chase contender.  

Cheryl
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Cheryl
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« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2005, 04:26:11 PM »

This is from an article by Mike Mulhern.  What wreck was McMurray involved in yesterday?  I really don't remember that...It just seems like more and more NASCAR says whatever they feel like to justify their actions.   :evil:

"NASCAR officials, who have been under the gun the past several weeks, didn't escape pointed questioning yesterday:

First, Jamie McMurray's car failed post-race inspection twice, for being too low, despite the crew being allowed to air up the tires. That post-race problem followed a similar situation at Dover involving winner Johnson, who got a no-call from NASCAR that was roundly criticized by most teams.

McMurray this time got a no-call too from NASCAR officials, who brushed off the failed inspection. NASCAR spokesman Jim Hunter said McMurray's car "was low, no doubt about it." But he said the reason was "he was in a wreck. And we deemed that was not a competitive advantage. The whole rear end of the car was messed up."

NASCAR's no-call, though, doesn't follow precedent for the sanctioning body, which, in one famous incident, fined Rusty Wallace $25,000 for being too low at Sonoma in the summer of 1996 even though Wallace's car had been banged up that afternoon and finished with a broken shock."

Cheryl
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Bryan Blanton
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« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2005, 08:05:02 PM »

I think i remember the nbc announcers saying something about mcmurray's car being ran into in the back area by sterling marlin sometime during yesterdays race.
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