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Author Topic: Window net  (Read 642 times)
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Vivian
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« on: June 13, 2005, 10:10:55 PM »

Can someone please explain to me why Carl Edwards was allowed to ride around under cautionwith the window net down when obviously not everyone was aware that the race was over?  There was so much movement still in the pack I thought everyone was expecting to be told there would be a g/w/c because they were not aware that the race was over.  Since the caution had come out before plus just as the white flag was due to be thrown, it certainly did not appear the race was over.  There was 3  laps to go when the caution was thrown as far as I could tell.  I thought you had to take the white before the caution or otherwise the race would then go to g/w/c.  Was anyone else confused by this?  Which rule is it?  White before caution or if total advertised laps have been run then g/w/c no matter what?Huh?  I know, rules as we go plan...
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Cheryl
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« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2005, 10:16:09 PM »

I didn't notice the window net thing with Carl, but then I only watched the last 10 minutes of the broadcast.  

But on the G/W/C issue, I know I was totally confused!  NASCAR has such a weird interpretation of G/W/C anyway, it always bugs me!  Any short track in America and every other racing series has multiple G/W/C until they get a clean finish.  So perhaps that's why I can't understand this "if the caution comes out on the white flag lap, it's over crap..."  as well as the "freezing the field" at that time.  Today, I read on Jayski that they went back and reviewed scoring and gave MW 5th place.  So obviously, NASCAR doesn't even understand what they're doing these days.  Not that it is any surprise.   :?

Cheryl
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Desmond
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« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2005, 04:21:15 PM »

Well, someone in the Roush camp was smart enough to know the score. Cool

Naah, Edwards was just lucky.  It could well have been NASCAR's equivalent of Bill Shoemaker, who at the 1957 Kentucky Derby stopped racing his horse on the quarter pole, thinking that it was the finish line and that he had won.  Obviously, he didn't win.
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Tech6Rick
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« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2005, 12:00:13 AM »

They explained it later. Since the yellow lasted until lap 200, the restart was a an overtime restart. That's the only g/w/c you get. Sounds right to me. Guess Jack and company are a lot more savy than I am. What's surprising is Na$car actually agreed.

Rick
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Vivian
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« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2005, 12:24:30 AM »

Okay, we have the g/w/c thing resolved.  But that still does not explain why Carl was allowed to immediately take his window net down when some of the cars had not crossed the finish line yet.  I know they take it down for a victory lap when everyone has crossed the finish line but I felt he was way premature in taking it down.  I just think it was too soon for the conditions at the end of the race.   :?
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TexasDeb
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« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2005, 01:12:47 AM »

I don't think there's any rule requiring the net to be in position under caution.  The drivers can take off their gloves and helmets and even release their belts.  Of course we're talking the NASCAR rulebook here, which no one has actually seen  Cheesy

Judging from the radio traffic played during the broadcast, Carl's crew chief or spotter made sure he knew the race wasn't over yet.  The comment was something like "come on around here and take the checkers then you can do whatever you want."

Deb
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